Home > News > Tensions Between Urban and Rural People and Places

More News

msa-conference

IPA Assistant Policy Scientist Attends MSA Conference

Chase E. Barnes recently attended the Main Street Now 2024 Conference in Birmingham, Alabama
 
Faculty Promotions Announced

Faculty Promotions Announced

Trustees approve 87 faculty promotions
Source: UDaily
 
'The Trail to Desegregation'

'The Trail to Desegregation'

Student project highlights Delaware connections to Brown v. Board of Education decision
Source: UDaily
 
CONNECT
InstagramFacebookTwitterEmailMake a GiftStay Informed
Donate to CHADCenter for Historic Architecture and Design (CHAD)
twitterfacebookflickrIPA PodcastMake a Gift

Tensions Between Urban and Rural People and Places

Image Picker for Section 0
Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Four UD student takeaways from the University of Chicago’s Bridging the Divide Conference

​Article by Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) Ithaca Student Leaders Simon Brand, Jenna DeMaio, Sathiya Kannon and Caleb Mathis ​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Bridging the cultural and political divide and what that means

SNF Ithaca Student Leaders Caleb, Sathiya, Jenna and Simon on the University of Chicago campus.

​SNF Ithaca Student Leaders Caleb, Sathiya, Jenna and Simon on the University of Chicago campus.

​From April 10–12, 2024, the University of Chicago Institute of Politics (IOP) convened students, policy experts, elected officials, and practitioners nationwide to explore the root causes of and develop solutions to urban-rural polarization at the Bridging the Divide conference. In this three-day-long experience, SNF Ithaca Student Leaders had distinct takeaways relating to the larger conversation about the urban-rural divide in America.​

Stepping onto the University of Chicago campus, we were immediately struck by the stunning gothic architecture surrounding us. In the following days, we would discuss not only urban places such as the academic institution and its surrounding community but also the “flyover state” Illinois farmlands and their rural populations.​

As the conference began, we immediately confronted the concept of an urban-rural divide in America. 

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

What fascinated us most was hearing the perspectives of the panelists and fellow students, each offering their unique insights and experiences. As students hailing from the mountains of Colorado to the shores of Maine, from the deep south of Georgia to the native reservations of Minnesota, our backgrounds couldn't have been more diverse. Yet, despite our differences, we found constructive common ground in our discussions about the root causes of this divide and if it truly exists. Rather than conflate our takeaways, we’ll each speak on our personal program highlights that stood out to us.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Changing the Narrative at the Grassroots - From Divide to Solidarity (Caleb Mathis)

Jenna, Sathiya, Caleb, and Simon sitting and listening to a panel.

​The three-day-long Bridging the Divide Conference explored the root causes of and developed solutions to urban-rural polarization.

​The discussion on intersectionality and political labels, “Changing the Narrative at the Grassroots - From Divide to Solidarity,” was incredibly impactful. The speakers' emphasis on recognizing the gray spaces in politics as bridges rather than divisions really resonated with me. It was enlightening to consider how individuals can embody multiple identities and beliefs without invalidating one another. This idea of being "more than one thing" struck a chord with me and made me think about embracing our complexity.​

The panelists' personal stories, such as the Black Republican DEI Representative advocating for diversity within her party, were incredibly inspiring.​

It made me think about how putting people in boxes can limit our ability to truly understand each other and have meaningful conversations. I felt connected to the idea that openness to diverse perspectives is essential for growth and collaboration. It reminded me that our differences should be seen as opportunities for learning and understanding, rather than as barriers to communication. Overall, the session was a powerful reminder of the importance of seeking common ground and engaging in meaningful dialogue, even when faced with opposing viewpoints.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Responding to violence (Simon Brand)

Simon and other conference attendees on the University of Chicago Medicine helipad.

​Simon and other conference attendees on the helipad at the University of Chicago Medicine's Level 1 Trauma Center.

​Topics like food insecurity and public health as prevalent issues in both urban and rural communities were recurring themes throughout the conference. On the first day, I participated in an off-site visit to the University of Chicago Medicine’s Level 1 Trauma Center, in a session titled “Models of Community Response and Care.” Situated on the south side of Chicago, the community surrounding the University of Chicago campus grapples with alarmingly high rates of gun violence. Before the establishment of the Trauma Center six years ago, victims of shootings in this area were transported to Northwestern Hospital on the other side of the city, often resulting in fatalities during transit. During our tour, we engaged with the Violence Recovery Program (VRP) staff who spoke about the community-driven efforts that led to the center’s establishment. They underscored the profound impact the delayed establishment of a local trauma center has had on the community, emphasizing the need for VRPs to address the enduring trauma of violence in their community. ​

“The Great American Loneliness: Health Disparities & Deaths of Despair in America” panel centered on the profound isolation experienced in rural areas, exacerbated by the ongoing opioid crisis. Over the past decade, instances of 'deaths of despair' have continued to increase, with panelists weighing in on how this growth stems from the public stigma surrounding the topic in these communities and the vital need for accessible addiction care, such as harm reduction services. One of the panelists, Army veteran Dale Kings, spoke about his own experience returning home to his rural community along the Ohio River of Portsmouth, Ohio, and the despair he saw taking over his town through the explosion of the opioid crisis. A novel solution he had for his community was the use of group fitness along with traditional therapy to reinstall hope and camaraderie within the small community. In a place that only has the remnants of a booming economy with old shoe factories and steel mills replaced with Walmart and Dollar General. ​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Economics of place (Jenna DeMaio)

Simon, Caleb, Jenna and Sathiya at the conference.

​ What fascinated us most about the conference was hearing the perspectives of the panelists and fellow students, each offering their unique insights and experiences.​

​In the panel “Should Economists Care About Place?,”​ economists Samuel Hammond and Brad Hershbein discussed and debated the role of place and its value in economic decision-making. The tensions between rural and urban America are highlighted uniquely through economics. As a Las Vegas native, I had only heard about Rust Belt auto manufacturing towns such as South Bend, Indiana, or, until the relatively recent financial crisis of 2008, Newark, Delaware. As an economics major, I understood the rationale behind prioritizing moving people to areas of economic activity rather than revitalizing declining towns. However, outside the classroom, I have also met people who were “left behind” by the closure of these factories.​

The panel suggested shifting away from the traditional divide of community economic development, attracting new businesses or improving infrastructure, and workforce development, helping individuals gain the skills and training they need to get good jobs. Instead, they proposed a focus on place-based policies that integrate both approaches. Rather than relocating people, policies should aim to help communities become self-sustaining. No blue-collar worker wants to be told what a “better” life is as defined by economists. To them, the life they have is already good. People and places aren’t just numbers and words on maps. They have stories to tell and cities they want to save; that has to come from inside that community as much as from outside. ​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

The role of religion (Sathiya Kannan)

Caleb, Sathiya, Jenna, and Simon at the Bean in Chicago.

​Caleb, Sathiya, Jenna, and Simon at the Bean in Chicago.​

​The “Politics as Religion: The Role of Faith in a Secularizing America” panel outlined a complex narrative surrounding the evolving dynamics of religion, politics and geography in America. The guest speakers established the stereotypical opposing groups, their understanding of each other through stereotypes and the pervasiveness of politics and religion, all of which have created divisiveness in political parties and religious followers. The divide between urban and rural people is exacerbated by many factors, particularly with younger generations, due language, behavior, and development that alienates and antagonizes others. The expectation of hatred from other political, religious, and geographic groups leads to a harmful self-fulfilling prophecy. Additionally, our generation’s maturation in an unprecedented, unstable, and often irrational political climate gives young people a flawed political consciousness that turns alternative perspectives into hostile agents. The use of performative, dismissive language also prevents open, diverse discussion. I was surprised by how clearly I saw myself in their descriptions and how I inadvertently contributed to the social divisiveness I aimed to resolve. ​

I was also surprised to discover how the strong ties between religion and volunteerism persist into the modern day. Liberal urbanites vote for government representatives to support larger social services, causing the government to outsource, fund and partner with conservative, religious communities to support said services. In a strange and surprising twist, urban and rural communities unite to battle societal issues with the government as an intermediary. However, the panelists believed that, with exposure to diverse individuals and sufficient time, a direct, harmonious connection could be struck between rural and urban.​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Conclusion

This conference showed us that there is a lack of understanding between rural and urban communities despite our considerable commonalities. Problems such as a lack of healthcare access appear in rural and urban communities alike. Still, how different settings solve such an issue might be different–sometimes radically different. Part of the solution to closing these gaps is continuing to show up in spaces like this, telling stories and sharing experiences.

But listening to one another doesn’t solve problems. After recognizing similarities and understanding differences, there is a need to take action. We often see differences as dividing points that weaken our country, yet America's strength lies in its differences. Life isn’t a zero-sum game. Embraced differences are what make more effective solutions for all. If we can hear and engage with one another and the ideas that might come from unexpected people or places, then we have a greater opportunity to address our collective challenges. So, how do we, as a diverse society, bridge these gaps for everyone? It's a big question, but one we've got to tackle head-on. As we left Chicago to head back to Delaware, we were reminded that the United States includes famous city skylines and small-town stores with highways and cornfields in between.

Learn more about the sessions and topics covered at this year’s conference by checking out the digital agenda or YouTube playlist.

Click here to learn more about the SNF Ithaca Initiative.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featured turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

News Story Supporting Images and Text
Used in the Home Page News Listing and for the News Rollup Page
Four UD student takeaways from the University of Chicago’s Bridging the Divide Conference
5/10/2024
5/10/2024
If not blank, this overrides the Sorting Date but ONLY for the CCRS home page
Page Settings and MetaData:
(Not Shown on the Page)
Page Settings
Tensions Between Urban and Rural People and Places
SPPA; SNF Ithaca
No
External News Source
Used to link to non UDaily stories
 
 
MetaData for Search Engine Optimization
Tensions Between Urban and Rural People and Places